Part 1 |GHBR part 2| Santa and Rudolph
The Great Huntingfield Brain Robbery
A play in four acts and nine scenes
: A dark murder mystery that mingles mad scientists, a Chinese invasion, Carry on up
the Village
and a refurbished Belles of St Trinain’s to wreak mayhem across the tranquil rural Suffolk post-war way of life.


 

GHBR title

AmygdalaThis is what all these scientists and gangsters are seeking – your amygdalae, the seat of all emotions, the tiny twin slivers deep inside the human brain where love and fear are formed. Could this be the magical missing ingredient that so many are willing to kill to acquire, that’s brought so much danger to the sleepy village of Huntingfield?

‘It was brilliant to come out and forget my troubles for a couple of hours, laughing and participating - I’d no idea what to expect but it was really good.  Today’s audience are in for a treat.’
Tracey, Linstead

GHBR map

‘Well done! All that effort in getting the production to a satisfactory conclusion paid off. We attended last night and both found it great fun!  If tonight’s performance is anything like last night’s you need have no worries...’
Jonathan, Ditchingham

First panel, opposite, clockwise from top left:
Evil Lord Lu Run Xaio, terror of the Shanghai underworld. The scientists, professor Godfrey Bazeley, Dame Cecily Spencer Ackroyd, professor Myron Bing, the mysterious Jagabundu. Itinerant tramps Harry, Whistling Jack and the Padre. The monster, Milton the murderer. Lord Lu, Myron and Jagabundu. The secretive, evil Hand working late in his laboratory, watched from a window by the play’s heroes, Mrs Legge, Nilda and Rex.

Tramps Alphonse and the Padre, about to meet their doom.

‘Many congratulations on such a great production - it was great fun and thoroughly enjoyed. My kids thought it was fantastic, they really 'got into it' and enjoyed the audience repartee and joining in with the singing (at the tops of their voices!)

‘Other comments I heard was 'what a great show' - ‘so complex it would even be difficult for a professional company of actors‘, ‘The Hand was really scary’, etc. etc.’
Sue, Huntingfield

With dire consequences an unsuspecting Ms Beryl Bing, with Felixtoe her cat, tests the new miracle foaming toothpaste developed by scientists up at top secret Hemroyd Hall Research Centre.

‘...brilliant, well done! I really enjoyed it – haven’t laughed as much in ages. It was very impressive.’
Liz, Ubbeston

Middle panel, opposite, clockwise from top left:
Rex and Nilda doing the Monster Mash. The breakthrough that will change the world: the evil Hand, at the moment of his momentous discovery. Sgt Wilkes helps PC Harris clean up the remains of poor, unfortunate Miss Beryl Bing. The schoolgirls prepare. A war huddle.

Bravo dahlings!! What fun it was on Saturday eve!  Thank you so much for a stupendous, triumphant show - such a shame it’s over!  The production was really classy in every respect and all your efforts shone through.
Sue 2, Huntingfield

Final panel, opposite, clockwise from top left:
The Narrator, with young Tom. Nilda gets ready for war. The Hand in his laboratory. Old Walter discovers Arthur’s brain is missing – perhaps old Walter’s brain is missing too? All set though minus his costume, Joe discovers he also needs an audience...

‘...we would like to host a party so we can rejoice in what we have achieved.’
Cast member


The cast:

Rex Avery...........................................Ben Cheyne
Nilda (Mrs Rex Avery)...........................Cion Cheyne
Brenda...............................................Jackie Driver
Sharon...............................................Jackie Weare
Genevieve..........................................Rose Thompson
Tabitha..............................................Olivia Harrison
Gwendolyn.........................................Lilia Pinnick-Smith
Miss Hinge..........................................Margaret Dennis
Miss Scroat.........................................Sue Lucas
Walter and Alphonse...........................Nigel Jerry
Carlie and PC Harris.............................Sue Tyler
Mrs Lucy Legge...................................Linda Berry
Arthur Legge......................................Brian Lucas
Professor Myron Bing..........................Mike Stephens
Professor Godfrey Bazeley...................Edward Watson
Jagabundu.........................................Joe Thompson
Sgt. Wilkes and The Padre....................Allan Barnes
Whistling Jack.....................................Ken Burnett
Harry.................................................Emma Zangs
Lord Lu Run Xaio.................................Tommy McGee
General Tang......................................Joan Baker
The invading Chinese army...................A coatrack
Dame Cecily Spencer Ackroyd...............Joe Burnett
(Joe also plays The Hand — boo!)
Frank Milton.......................................Steve Moorhouse
Miss Beryl Bing and Felixtoe her cat......Liz Forrester and Bo
Narrator.............................................Stephen Harrison

Technical experts and crew:
Sets director.......................................Liz Forrester
Light and sound...................................David Burrows
Scene-changer in chief..........................Brian Lucas
Props..................................................Liz, Brian, Stephen
Prompter............................................Marian Cannell
Costumes/ wardrobe...........................Helen Cannon + cast members

Written and directed by Ken Burnett

Produced by Stephen Harrison

Photos by Charlie Burnett.

An Old Groynes production
© 2018 The Old Groynes Theatre Company


Please remember to take your brain
with you as you leave the theatre.

More comments, photos and
some fun video clips from the actual performances, here.

Santa

See here for another OG special – a short Christmas play for children, performed at Huntingfield’s world-famous church.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 




 

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Many ask, ‘Where does the name of your theatre company come from? Veteran Old Groyne and company founder Stephen Harrison explains, 'There once was a sign,’ he says, ‘just off Southwold beach in splendid Suffolk that warned would-be waders to ‘BEWARE OF OLD GROYNES.’ The name stuck. No one who’s seen any of our productions considers it inappropriate.

Back to Ken Burnett’s website